Articles Tagged with medical bills

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Personal injury Lawyer Matt Arnold answers the question: “What should I do if I have been injured by another party but I can’t afford a lawyer?”

A popular magician, David Copperfield, was found to be not liable by a Nevada judge for injuries an audience member sustained at one of his shows, according to The Washington Post. In an illusion knows as the “Lucky 13,” 13 audience members volunteer to be picked to go onstage and be ushered into a cage. After the audience members are in the cage, the cage is hoisted into the air while Copperfield engages in banter with the now dangling audience members.

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Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “What if the accident was my fault?”

“Collateral source rule” may not mean much to most people. The legal phrase, though unfamiliar, is incredibly important in the context of personal injury cases. The Tennessee Supreme Court recently heard a case on the subject that captured the attention of the local legal community. In that case, the Supreme Court had to decide whether the collateral source rule, a bedrock principle of personal injury law, would remain in place. The decision has important implications in Tennessee and elsewhere.

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Charlotte Injury Lawyer Matt Arnold answers the question: “Should I file the property damage claim with the at-fault driver’s insurance company or with my insurance company?”

When most people are involved in an accident they do not spend time thinking about how liability will be apportioned amongst the defendants. Instead, plaintiffs in personal injury accidents are busy thinking about when they will return to work and how they will pay their mounting medical bills. Though it is understandable that personal injury victims have other more important things on their mind, liability apportionment matters a great deal and is crucial to ensuring the accident victim receives the compensation he or she deserves. To learn more about how financial responsibility for an accident is divided among defendants, in North Carolina and elsewhere, keep reading.

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Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “May I choose my own doctor in a personal injury case?”

If you’ve been injured at work, you’ve likely got a lot of things on your mind. Beyond trying to recover from your injuries, you may be worrying about when you’ll return to work and how you’ll be able to keep your family afloat in the meantime. Medical bills need to be paid, along with your ordinary household expenses, and a workplace injury can keep you off your feet and out of a steady paycheck for weeks, months or even years. Given the serious issues you have to contend with, worrying about things like where to file your lawsuit won’t rise to the top of your list. Issues such as proper jurisdiction can occasionally prove thorny and are best left to your personal injury attorney to sort out.

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Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “Can I post about my injury on Social Media?”

When personal injury cases make it on the front page it’s usually for one of two reasons. Either the case is a true tragedy where victims suffered unimaginable harm, or the case seems ridiculous, serving as an example of a tort system seemingly run amok. When the headlines fall into this latter category it can skew people’s idea of what a personal injury case is. All they see are the silly headlines, lacking entirely in legal analysis or context. Rather than allowing the media to portray every personal injury as if it were assured of success no matter how odd, it’s important to understand that the majority of these cases fail because the law imposes serious burdens that plaintiffs must confront before they’re able to collect damages. Though the news might lead you to believe it’s easy to cash in every time you bump or bruise yourself, the reality is far more difficult.