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Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “Can I post about my injury on Social Media?”

It is not often that cases involving casual holiday parties and relatively minor injuries make their way to state supreme courts. However, that is exactly what has happened in Michigan where the Supreme Court has now heard arguments about what occurred during a 2013 office holiday party. Though the particulars are not of interest to the court, the case is being used as a vehicle to explore the legal obligations property owners owe to ensure the safety of invited guests.

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Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “May I choose my own doctor in a personal injury case?”

The sad reality is that one of the many hurdles personal injury victims often are forced to overcome is the skepticism by some concerning the severity of their injuries. The idea that those who have been involved in accidents that resulted in injuries are somehow faking the harm they have suffered or exaggerating it for effect exists among a certain segment of the population. In court, it is important for plaintiffs to attack this notion directly, using testimony and medical evidence to demonstrate that injuries really occurred and that the pain suffered by the victim is legitimate.

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Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “Can I post about my injury on Social Media?”

For years now, personal injury attorneys have warned plaintiffs to be very careful about the kinds of information they choose to reveal online. Despite the calls for restraint, many find social media simply too irresistible and can inadvertently undermine their cases by saying or doing the wrong thing and then broadcasting it far and wide. Many mistakenly believe that by making posts private they protect themselves from disclosure. A recent personal injury case in New York proves that this is not always the case and should hopefully serve as a warning to others.

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Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “The insurance company wants to send me to their own doctor for a second opinion. Do I have to go?”

Anyone who has ever been involved in a car accident likely understands how frustrating it can be dealing with an insurance company. The adjusters understand that their job is to settle any claim for as little money as possible. This is why so many injured individuals turn to personal injury attorneys for assistance, discovering that attempts to resolve their issue alone often go nowhere. A recent case in Florida demonstrates just how difficult insurance companies can be. Unlike many examples, this one has a slight silver lining, with the insurance company now facing serious potential liability due to its poor treatment of the injured victim.

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Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “What if my employer doesn’t have workers’ comp insurance or doesn’t file the claim?”

We routinely hear that special interest groups exert outsize influence on legislation. Whether at the local, state or federal level, those industries with money to spend and lobbyists to hire are able to profoundly influence laws that govern us all. Though we might hear about this as a general area of concern, it is not often that we have specific examples of this playing out. One recent case in Oklahoma that made it all the way to the state Supreme Court did just that, revealing the power of certain moneyed special interest groups and the importance of an active judiciary to keep that power in check.

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Personal injury Lawyer Matt Arnold answers the question: “If I am injured in a car accident or at work what should I do?”

It is unfortunately all too common in personal injury cases that employers and insurance companies to dig up dirt on injured employees. In cases where a company has a lot of money on the line, it is routine for the company to pull out all the stops in putting together its defense. This means combing through social media accounts, talking to friends and family members and even hiring private investigators to follow the person. The goal of all of these actions is to find an inconsistency in the injured person’s behavior that can be used against him or her in court. These inconsistencies can make jurors doubt the injured worker’s claims and lead to a reduced injury award.

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Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “What if the medical condition improves before the hearing?”

A recent case in Illinois exemplifies to many exactly why personal injury cases can be so important. The challenge of bringing a personal injury claim is great; one must try and quantify the unquantifiable; put a price tag on the pain the plaintiff has experienced (and will continue to experience). At its best, a personal injury suit awards victims the money they need to try and rebuild their lives. Though the system is imperfect, it can succeed in giving hope.

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Personal injury Lawyer Matt Arnold answers the question: “If I am injured in a car accident or at work what should I do?”

When a person thinks of an “automobile”, chances are they imagine nearly anything roadworthy. The term is conventionally defined broadly, and includes things like cars, vans, trucks, tractor-trailers, motorcycle and buses. Though this might be what most people think of when they imagine an automobile, most people, at least those in Washington State, would be wrong. A recent personal injury case there hinged on the definition of “automobile” and the answer about what qualifies might surprise you, it certainly surprised the plaintiff.

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Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “The insurance company wants to send me to their own doctor for a second opinion. Do I have to go?”

Many people may not think that the status of their insurance has anything to do with their ability to bring a personal injury case following a car accident. After all, a car crash and the liability of the parties involved has little, if anything, to do with the particulars of the underlying insurance policy. A judge in New Jersey clearly disagreed with such reasoning and in an interesting recent personal injury case, ruled that faulty insurance was enough to get a lawsuit tossed out of court. To learn more about why the insurance flaws were seen as fundamental to the personal injury case, keep reading.

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Charlotte Injury Lawyer Matt Arnold answers the question: “How much time do I have to file a claim for my personal injuries after an accident?”

Every once in a while an important case comes along that sends the legal system scrambling. Many imagine these cases receive a great degree of fanfare, with names that stick in everyone’s mind. Though that is certainly true in some cases, there are a number of crucially important Supreme Court cases that have tremendous impact on the legal system, which are never widely known outside of the legal community. One example of that is the recently decided Bristol-Myers Squibb case.