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Charlotte Injury Lawyer Matt Arnold answers the question: “Should I file the property damage claim with the at-fault driver’s insurance company or with my insurance company?”

When most people are involved in an accident they do not spend time thinking about how liability will be apportioned amongst the defendants. Instead, plaintiffs in personal injury accidents are busy thinking about when they will return to work and how they will pay their mounting medical bills. Though it is understandable that personal injury victims have other more important things on their mind, liability apportionment matters a great deal and is crucial to ensuring the accident victim receives the compensation he or she deserves. To learn more about how financial responsibility for an accident is divided among defendants, in North Carolina and elsewhere, keep reading.

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Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can I represent myself on a traffic ticket?”

With the number of auto accident fatalities rising, many have been eager to identify the source of the increase. Some have blamed the increasing prevalence of smartphones and the attraction of text messaging. Others say that the rise can be attributed to a more general increase in the number of people on the roads. Still others blame pedestrians and bicyclists, saying that their distraction as well as increased presence on roadways is leading to higher numbers of deaths.

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Personal injury Lawyer Matt Arnold answers the question: “If I am injured in a car accident or at work what should I do?”

A recent legal article about liability for harm suffered by employees on-the-job contained a curious reference to a New York law that few outside of the state ever encounter. The law is known as the Scaffold Law and it apples to construction projects located in New York State. To learn more about the law, its origins, its critics and what may come of it, keep reading.

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Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “Can I post about my injury on Social Media?”

It has been a bad summer for personal injury plaintiffs thanks to several recent decisions by the U.S. Supreme Court. In a few different cases, the Court made clear that it intends to protect corporations at the expense of injured plaintiffs, worrying over potential harm suffered by the giant companies, while ignoring the actual harm suffered by individuals. Unfortunately, a recent decision, Bristol-Myers Squibb v. Superior Court of California, continues the same worrying trend.

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Charlotte Injury Lawyer Matt Arnold answers the question: “Should I file the property damage claim with the at-fault driver’s insurance company or with my insurance company?”

Imagine what would happen if you were harmed in some way by a company. It could be financial injury from a bank or other financial services company. Or perhaps an injury tied to the loss of personal information, possibly in a hacking episode. Maybe even physical injury if the company owns a hospital or a nursing home. In any case, most people would expect the next step would be to reach out to a personal injury attorney and file suit. Sadly, filing suit is less and less likely these days, with companies across a multitude of industries embracing arbitration agreements.

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Why should I hire an attorney to represent me in a personal injury claim?

Whenever there’s a stampede, it’s important to look carefully to find the cause. People don’t move suddenly and in large numbers for no reason, after all. If there’s a dramatic increase in activity, it’s a good idea to find out why. The same holds true when it comes to lawyers. If you see attorneys taking action all of sudden and seemingly without warning it makes sense to pay attention and try to learn more about what might be going on.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What happens if I am convicted of a DUI or DWI in Charlotte North Carolina?”

There’s been a big push in recent years by states across the country to legalize the use of marijuana. Though some started by limiting use to medicinal purposes, many have expanded beyond medicine into personal use. The argument in favor is that crimes involving marijuana unnecessarily harm individuals and clog up the court and jail system, all over something that isn’t even that destructive, at least relative to alcohol and other legal substances.

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Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “May I choose my own doctor in a personal injury case?”

If you’ve been injured at work, you’ve likely got a lot of things on your mind. Beyond trying to recover from your injuries, you may be worrying about when you’ll return to work and how you’ll be able to keep your family afloat in the meantime. Medical bills need to be paid, along with your ordinary household expenses, and a workplace injury can keep you off your feet and out of a steady paycheck for weeks, months or even years. Given the serious issues you have to contend with, worrying about things like where to file your lawsuit won’t rise to the top of your list. Issues such as proper jurisdiction can occasionally prove thorny and are best left to your personal injury attorney to sort out.

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Charlotte Injury Lawyer Matt Arnold answers the question: “Do I have to pay taxes on a settlement or jury award in a personal injury case?”

Those in Florida who have suffered serious personal injuries due to the negligent or reckless action of doctors can rejoice after a recently issued state Supreme Court ruling. While other states debate passing new and more strict damage caps, those in Florida have come under intense fire from a skeptical judiciary. Though doctors, hospitals and insurance companies may complain, victims of medical malpractice and their advocates say the recent ruling tossing out damage caps is cause for celebration.

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Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “How do worker comps payments work?”

It’s been a rough start for the Trump administration by almost any measure. They’ve had trouble articulating their legislative vision for the country and have had even more trouble executing. One of the few policy positions that has been made clear is the desire to streamline regulations, something the administration views as unnecessarily oppressive and anti-business. Though some have celebrated the change, many others are skeptical if not outright hostile, especially as the practical impact of that ideology begins to come into focus.