Articles Tagged with injury lawsuit

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Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “How do worker comps payments work?”

We all know that in personal injury cases, settlement is a common end result. Though there are lots of reasons why this is the case, a big one is the degree of uncertainty on both sides. No one knows for sure how a jury may find, no matter how strong the case may appear in advance. The reality is that going to trial is inherently risky. Settling helps reduce that risk, ensuring you walk away with something, even if it is not what you may have hoped for.

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Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can you sue for in a personal injury case?”

What started years ago as a single claim against Johnson & Johnson has snowballed into a potentially multi-billion dollar legal mess. A recent jury verdict in California amounts to a major defeat for J&J regarding the potential harm caused by its popular baby powder. Experts say that the recent result is likely to make problems even worse for the company, as more and more injured victims come out of the woodwork. J&J appears to hope that by using some procedural issues it can make the filing of claims more difficult and reduce potential payouts.

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Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “May I choose my own doctor in a personal injury case?”

If you’ve been injured at work, you’ve likely got a lot of things on your mind. Beyond trying to recover from your injuries, you may be worrying about when you’ll return to work and how you’ll be able to keep your family afloat in the meantime. Medical bills need to be paid, along with your ordinary household expenses, and a workplace injury can keep you off your feet and out of a steady paycheck for weeks, months or even years. Given the serious issues you have to contend with, worrying about things like where to file your lawsuit won’t rise to the top of your list. Issues such as proper jurisdiction can occasionally prove thorny and are best left to your personal injury attorney to sort out.

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Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can you sue for in a personal injury case?”

United Airlines has been having a bad run of things recently. It started with the young girls denied boarding for wearing leggings, then reached a peak frenzy after dragging a paid passenger off a flight in Chicago. That incident led to a personal injury lawsuit and was quickly settled, United smartly realizing it didn’t need the bad publicity to continue another moment. After resolving that recent debacle, United appears to have stumbled into yet another personal injury issue, this time involving a rough landing.

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Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “What exactly is a wrongful death claim?”

Most people take comfort when they see that a road has guardrails. The barriers are supposed to be there to save lives, keeping vehicles and the people inside of them on the roadways. Though guardrails have saved countless lives, trouble can occur in some cases when defectively designed or poorly tested guardrails are installed. Rather than serving as a kind of protection, the guardrails instead created added danger and, in some particularly gruesome cases, have claimed lives. To learn more about recent concerns involving guardrails, keep reading.

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Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “Can I post about my injury on Social Media?”

When personal injury cases make it on the front page it’s usually for one of two reasons. Either the case is a true tragedy where victims suffered unimaginable harm, or the case seems ridiculous, serving as an example of a tort system seemingly run amok. When the headlines fall into this latter category it can skew people’s idea of what a personal injury case is. All they see are the silly headlines, lacking entirely in legal analysis or context. Rather than allowing the media to portray every personal injury as if it were assured of success no matter how odd, it’s important to understand that the majority of these cases fail because the law imposes serious burdens that plaintiffs must confront before they’re able to collect damages. Though the news might lead you to believe it’s easy to cash in every time you bump or bruise yourself, the reality is far more difficult.

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Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can you sue for in a personal injury case?”

We all know smoking can kill, but in one man’s recent wrongful death claim against a Tennessee pipe tobacco and cigar store, he did not allege that the shop’s products were what killed his wife.

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Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “Can I post about my injury on Social Media?”

Malicious prosecution just may be the hot-button lawsuit of the week. In our criminal blog this week (link here?), we discuss a South Carolina man a jury recently awarded $150,000 in his lawsuit against the county sheriff’s office for malicious prosecution. In addition, one recent and completely unrelated case in North Carolina proves just how varying the underlying circumstances leading to this type of lawsuit can be.

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Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can you sue for in a personal injury case?”

Any festival with a name like “Punkin Chunkin” sounds like it would have to be a good time. Unfortunately, news reports indicate the Delaware festival, where individuals sign up to propel pumpkins as far as possible, took a tragic turn this weekend.

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Charlotte Injury Lawyer Matt Arnold answers the question: “How long will it take for my case to be resolved?”

The woman suing University of Oklahoma running back Joe Mixon for allegedly punching her in the face in 2014 is fighting the football player’s efforts to get the venue, or location, of the lawsuit changed to Oklahoma, where the incident occurred.