Articles Tagged with personal injury settlement

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Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can you sue for in a personal injury case?”

It is not uncommon to hear personal injury attorneys talk about whether or not they have settled a case or taken the case to trial. Studies have found that up to 97% of personal injury cases that are filed in the United States settle out of court. They do not go all the way to trial. If this seems like a high percentage to you, that is because it is. It is rare for a personal injury suit to make it to trial, but that is not to say that there are not cases that go to trial. There are many reasons that a case might settle. Just because a settlement offer is made, it does not mean that the settlement offer has to be accepted.

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Charlotte Injury Lawyer Matt Arnold answers the question: “What is the value of my case?”

When you have been injured, regardless how serious, the first priority is healing and figuring out how to move forward with your life. Additionally, you might also decide to pursue a legal avenue for recovering for your damages. A personal injury suit is a way to recover damages for the injuries you sustained because of the negligence or wrongful act of another. You might think that this is straight-forward. You get injured, file a suit, prove damages, and receive your award. This is not always true. Personal injury suits can be complicated and difficult. There are many factors, which might be surprising to some, that can alter personal injury suit outcomes.

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Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “How do worker comps payments work?”

We all know that in personal injury cases, settlement is a common end result. Though there are lots of reasons why this is the case, a big one is the degree of uncertainty on both sides. No one knows for sure how a jury may find, no matter how strong the case may appear in advance. The reality is that going to trial is inherently risky. Settling helps reduce that risk, ensuring you walk away with something, even if it is not what you may have hoped for.