Articles Tagged with Charlotte injury attorney

Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “Can I post about my injury on Social Media?”

When personal injury cases make it on the front page it’s usually for one of two reasons. Either the case is a true tragedy where victims suffered unimaginable harm, or the case seems ridiculous, serving as an example of a tort system seemingly run amok. When the headlines fall into this latter category it can skew people’s idea of what a personal injury case is. All they see are the silly headlines, lacking entirely in legal analysis or context. Rather than allowing the media to portray every personal injury as if it were assured of success no matter how odd, it’s important to understand that the majority of these cases fail because the law imposes serious burdens that plaintiffs must confront before they’re able to collect damages. Though the news might lead you to believe it’s easy to cash in every time you bump or bruise yourself, the reality is far more difficult.

Personal injury Lawyer Matt Arnold answers the question: “If I am injured in a car accident or at work what should I do?”

If you’ve been involved in an auto accident, chances are you’re confused about exactly what comes next. If you’re like most people, you haven’t been involved in any lawsuits before and are unfamiliar not only with the legal system generally, but with the personal injury process specifically. To help guide you through the complex process, consider the following bits of advice. These are suggestions of things not to do and are accumulated from various experts who understand personal injury and car accident cases well.

Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can you sue for in a personal injury case?”

In a confusing case recently filed in Texas, a personal injury attorney has filed a personal injury suit against a personal injury law firm related to a personal injury suit the firm is pursuing on behalf of other personal injury clients. The case concerns a class action litigation surrounding inferior vena cava filters, or IVCs. A Texas attorney sued an Arizona law firm, the Arentz Law Group, for making unsolicited phone calls in an attempt to round up potential claimants.

Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can you sue for in a personal injury case?”

Read the newspaper regularly and it won’t take long to run across another article about a data breach. Whether it’s a health care company, a major retail or restaurant chain, the problem of hackers stealing customer financial data is a serious one and appears to be growing worse at a rapid pace.

Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matthew R. Arnold of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “What if my employer doesn’t have workers’ comp insurance or doesn’t file the claim?”

Fox Sports correspondent Erin Andrews just received a $55 million judgment from the Tennessee jury in her personal injury case against the man caught stalking her through hotel-wall peepholes back in 2008. As monumental as this verdict sounds, this does not mean Andrews will actually get anything close to the $55 million. A defendant claiming he is broke, tax codes, attorney’s fees and a likely appeal are all going to severely undercut whatever amount the sportscaster is able to take home.

Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matthew R. Arnold of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “Can I wait a few months to pursue a personal injury claim?”

Last week the newly elected mayor of Flint, Michigan, Karen Weaver, made a bold decision. Rather than continue to sweep mounting concerns about the city’s drinking water and the impact it may have had or continue to have on residents under the rug, she decided to declare a state of emergency. The decision brought nationwide attention to Flint and the city’s water supply as well as the often-overlooked problems caused from exposure to lead.

Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matthew R. Arnold of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “What exactly is a wrongful death claim?”

Damage caps in personal injury cases have become an increasingly hot topic in recent years, with courts across the country wrestling with the issue. State high courts have been left to decide whether and when such caps, usually on noneconomic damages or medical malpractice payouts, are appropriate or even constitutional. Some, such as Florida, have decided that such caps are not only unconstitutional, but also completely ineffective. Others, like the recent case in Tennessee, have looked for ways to avoid making such a decision. To find out more about the recent case, keep reading.