Articles Tagged with Dog Bite

Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “What does the “one-bite rule” mean in NC dog bite cases?”

Although dogs are often considered man’s best friend, the relationship can quickly turn sour in the event of a dog bite that causes personal injury. North Carolina’s dog bite laws and personal injury court cases can be hard for the average citizen to fully comprehend. The following are  answers to some frequently asked questions about dog bite laws in North Carolina.

Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “What does the “one-bite rule” mean in NC dog bite cases?”

Dogs are the most popular pet in the United States. There are more than 90 million dogs as pets, so it is no wonder that you will have an encounter with a dog at some time in your life. Dog bites are not all that uncommon and they happen daily. Most dog bites are minor, but they can be extremely harmful in some cases. A dog bite, like some other types of injuries, can in some cases be prevented. If the dog owner was negligent, they might be responsible for your medical bills and other damages. An experienced personal injury attorney will help you get the compensation you deserve for your damages.

Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “What does the “one-bite rule” mean in NC dog bite cases?”

Dogs have always been called “man’s best friend,” thanks to their loyalty, usefulness and kindness toward their owners. However, if they are not treated properly they can develop aggressive behaviors that may lead to serious injuries or death. Each year in the United States alone, there are more than 4 million incidents involving dog bites.

Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “What does the “one-bite rule” mean in NC dog bite cases?”

Anyone who has been attacked by a dog knows that the experience is frightening. While man’s best friend is usually a source of comfort and protection, sometimes a dog loses control and attacks a misperceived threat, such as a mail carrier or guest visiting someone’s home

Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “What does the “one-bite rule” mean in NC dog bite cases?”

Just about everyone loves dogs. If you walk down the street and see a cute dog, you smile and maybe even ask to pet it. More and more businesses are allowing dogs to be inside the premises. “Pet friendly” refers to the practice of businesses allowing patrons to bring their dogs into a store while they shop. This is not just service dogs, but dogs who are simply companions.

Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matthew R. Arnold of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “What does the “one-bite rule” mean in NC dog bite cases?”

On May 18, 2015, a four-year-old Conover boy was bitten by his grandparents’ German Shepard. The dog was a trained guard dog who only listened to the command of the child’s grandmother. Unfortunately, the child’s grandmother was in the house at the time of the attack.

Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matthew R. Arnold of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “What does the “one-bite rule” mean in NC dog bite cases?”

I recently came across an article listing some of the most common examples of personal injury claims. As you might expect, the list began with car accidents, an incredibly common source of personal injury cases in North Carolina and elsewhere. The sheer number of vehicles on the road all but guarantees a constant supply of new automobile injury cases. Another category on the list that is less well understood concerns premises liability. Though few people know the phrase, premises liability is an important concept that touches on a wide range of injuries and represents a sizable chunk of personal injury cases. To learn more about premises liability in North Carolina, keep reading.

Attorney Matthew R. Arnold answering the question: “What if the medical condition improves before the hearing?”

 

A recent accident in New Jersey involving actor and comedian Tracy Morgan highlights the extreme dangers posed by exhausted drivers. The crash earlier this month left the former 30 Rock star in critical condition and has now led to criminal charges for the driver of the tractor-trailer responsible for the accident.

 

Bed at night Charlotte Truck Accident Lawyer North Carolina Injury AttorneyPolice say the chain-reaction crash began when a tractor-trailer driver, Kevin Roper, collided with Morgan’s chauffeured limousine bus. Morgan was heading back home from a comedy show in Delaware with a group of friends at the time. The accident spread out across the interstate and left one member of Morgan’s entourage dead and two others critically injured. Morgan and the others were airlifted to nearby hospitals for treatment and several remain in intensive care even now.

 

The driver of the truck has been charged with death by auto and also faces four counts of assault by auto related to the crash. The trucker was given a $50,000 bail and has now hired an attorney to fight for his freedom.

 

Given the seriousness of the crash and the involvement of a commercial motor vehicle, investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board stepped in to examine what may have caused the accident. A recent report issued by the NTSB says that the driver of the rig that slammed into Morgan’s van was speeding at the time of the crash and was likely exhausted from working more than 13 consecutive hours.

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Attorney Matthew R. Arnold answering the question: “The insurance adjuster is saying I am partially negligent what does that mean?”

 

Police in Gaston County, North Carolina say that five people have been injured after a car and an ambulance were involved in a crash. The wreck occurred in the later afternoon and took place on a busy stretch of highway.

 

Parked ambulance Charlotte Accident Attorney North Carolina Injury LawyerAccording to officers with the North Carolina Highway Patrol, the crash occurred when an ambulance operated by two EMTS was hit by an oncoming car carrying three people. The ambulance was from the Stanley Fire and Rescue and was in the process of responding to an emergency call at the time of the accident.

 

Emergency responders say that four of those injured in the accident were ultimately transported to CaroMont Regional Medical Center for serious but non-life threatening injuries. The other person was taken to Carolinas Medical Center in Charlotte and is said to have suffered serious harm.

 

Stunningly, the terrible accident was caught on video thanks to in-cabin cameras located on the newer ambulances operated by Stanley Fire and Rescue. The driver of the ambulance was Roger Arrowood, a part-time employee who survived with relatively minor injuries.

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Attorney Matthew R. Arnold answering the question: “What can you sue for in a personal injury case?”

 

A North Carolina Senate committed has added language to a piece of legislation that will now require drivers of mopeds to purchase liability insurance before legally operating the vehicles on state roadways. The measure, House Bill 1145, has already been approved by the house, though the new language will need to be agreed to before the bill progresses any further.
Moped parked Charlotte Injury Lawyer North Carolina Accident AttorneyThe language attached by the Senate says that moped drivers are required to register their vehicles with the North Carolina Division of Motor Vehicles, in addition to purchasing liability coverage. Moped drivers will have until July 1, 2015 to comply with the new regulations.

 

Under current North Carolina law, mopeds are not among those vehicles that must be registered or insured in the state. Mopeds are also not subject to any property taxes, allowing owners to essentially avoid any fees associated with their use.

 

The new measure would require moped owners to pay a $15 registration fee as well as demonstrate to the Division of Motor Vehicles that the moped was designed and manufactured specifically for highway use. These requirements mirror those for motorcyclists, something that some legislators believe is necessary to guarantee the safety of all North Carolina motorists.

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