Articles Tagged with premises liability

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Personal injury Lawyer Matt Arnold answers the question: “What should I do if I have been injured by another party but I can’t afford a lawyer?”

A popular magician, David Copperfield, was found to be not liable by a Nevada judge for injuries an audience member sustained at one of his shows, according to The Washington Post. In an illusion knows as the “Lucky 13,” 13 audience members volunteer to be picked to go onstage and be ushered into a cage. After the audience members are in the cage, the cage is hoisted into the air while Copperfield engages in banter with the now dangling audience members.

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Charlotte Injury Lawyer Matt Arnold answers the question: “Do I have to pay taxes on a settlement or jury award in a personal injury case?”

If you fall in a store or a restaurant or a friend’s house, does that automatically entitle you to compensation? Some people think that anything bad that happens on the property of another person is worthy of compensation. Though sometimes that may be true, there are a number of complicated factors that determine whether a personal injury premises liability claim is possible. If a property owner knew about a dangerous condition and did nothing to fix it, you might stand a good chance at collecting some money. If the property owner took reasonable care of the premises and your accident occurred seemingly out of the blue, you might find yourself on your own when the medical bills arrive. To find out more, keep reading.

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Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matthew R. Arnold of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “Can I wait a few months to pursue a personal injury claim?”

Last year, Canadian-born tennis player Eugenie Bouchard was the sport’s next big star.  The 21-year-old reached the final of Wimbledon and the semifinals of the Australian Open and the French Open.  Her ranking peaked at No. 5 in the world.  Today, however, Bouchard can’t step foot on a tennis court, and a recent suit suggests that negligence on behalf of the United States Tennis Association (USTA) is to blame.

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Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matthew R. Arnold of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “What can you sue for in a personal injury case?”

A recent slip-and-fall case out of New Jersey managed to grab the attention of the state Supreme Court. The New Jersey High Court ruled unanimously on Monday that instructions to the jury in a lower court personal injury case were flawed and that this prejudiced the result, leading the Court to order a new trial.

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Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matthew R. Arnold of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “What does the “one-bite rule” mean in NC dog bite cases?”

I recently came across an article listing some of the most common examples of personal injury claims. As you might expect, the list began with car accidents, an incredibly common source of personal injury cases in North Carolina and elsewhere. The sheer number of vehicles on the road all but guarantees a constant supply of new automobile injury cases. Another category on the list that is less well understood concerns premises liability. Though few people know the phrase, premises liability is an important concept that touches on a wide range of injuries and represents a sizable chunk of personal injury cases. To learn more about premises liability in North Carolina, keep reading.

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Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matthew R. Arnold of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “What can you sue for in a personal injury case?”

A recent crash involving the new Charlotte trolley system illustrates an important but often misunderstood aspect of North Carolina personal injury law. Though many people assume that when you’ve been injured in an accident caused by someone else you can simply sue to receive compensation for your damages, regardless of whether you as the victim may be somewhat responsible for the accident. In North Carolina, the personal injury laws make it impossible for a victim to sue the person that caused the harm if the victim is found to be at fault in any way for the accident.