Our office continues to operate during our regular business hours, which are 8:30 am - 5:30 pm, Monday through Friday, but you can call the office 24 hours a day. We continue to follow all recommendations and requirements of the State of Emergency Stay at Home Order. Consultations are available via telephone or by video conference. The safety of our clients and employees is of the utmost importance and, therefore, in-person meetings are not available at this time except for emergencies or absolutely essential legal services.

Articles Tagged with Mecklenburg attorney

Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: ” Is a tractor-trailer accident the same as an automobile accident?”

As the idea of autonomous vehicles inches closer to reality, many questions remain to be answered. There are questions about safety and reliability and central to both is the issue of legal liability. Today, when an accident takes place it’s the driver (and his or her insurance company) that is personally on the hook for any damages. Once the driver cedes control to a machine, who becomes liable then? The vehicle’s owner? The vehicle’s manufacturer? The software designer?

Charlotte Injury Lawyer Matt Arnold answers the question: “How much time do I have to file a claim for my personal injuries after an accident?”

For those who own automobiles, you’ve likely been met with bad news when you opened your recent renewal letters. Insurance companies say that rates across the country have been on the rise, reversing years of declines. What’s the reason for the increase? Most experts say that there is a clear link between increases in insurance rates and the prevalence of smartphones. The personal electronics are now so commonplace and can be so distracting that the number of auto accidents, injuries and deaths are rising, leading to a corresponding rise in the rate that ordinary people must pay to insure their vehicles.

Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can you sue for in a personal injury case?”

What happens if you’re an undocumented immigrant who is injured in a personal injury accident? In California, the rule has long been that though immigration status would not preclude you from recovering damages, it could result in a much lower verdict. The reason is that a plaintiff’s immigration status was admissible evidence that could be used in calculating damages due to lost future earnings, with the plaintiff being required to calculate earnings outside of the U.S. The rule has changed in recent months thanks to passage of a new law and will hopefully bring more clarity to the personal injury system.

Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can you sue for in a personal injury case?”

Most people think that if they leave a bad review online that’s the end of the story, often believing the person who left the negative comments gets the last word. Though this might be true some of the time, a recent lawsuit in California indicates that the victim of the review can occasionally have the last laugh and, even more surprising, can hold the site where the review was posted accountable.

Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “What can you sue for in a personal injury case?”

The leadership at New Red Mountain Missionary Baptist Church in Durham may have ignored, humiliated and laughed at their treasurer Norman Glenn when he pushed them to undergo an audit, but they didn’t spit in his food. And according to the North Carolina Court of Appeal’s recent ruling, this fact is the reason Glenn’s claim for intentional infliction of emotional distress against the church fails.

Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matthew R. Arnold of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “What if my employer doesn’t have workers’ comp insurance or doesn’t file the claim?”

Fox Sports correspondent Erin Andrews just received a $55 million judgment from the Tennessee jury in her personal injury case against the man caught stalking her through hotel-wall peepholes back in 2008. As monumental as this verdict sounds, this does not mean Andrews will actually get anything close to the $55 million. A defendant claiming he is broke, tax codes, attorney’s fees and a likely appeal are all going to severely undercut whatever amount the sportscaster is able to take home.

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