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Articles Tagged with skydiving negligence

Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Brad Smith answers the question: ” Do I have to pay a fee to meet with an attorney about my personal injury case?”

While skydiving accidents are not as common as car crashes or even boating accidents, you can be injured while performing a maneuver due to faulty or defective equipment or due to lack of experience.

Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matthew R. Arnold of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “What if the accident was my fault?”

 

Public policy has ended a man’s lawsuit against a bar owner for injuries the man sustained in a skydiving incident.

skydiving Charlotte Injury Lawyer North Carolina Wrongful Death AttorneyThe man, Stephen Scheuren, was a spectator at The Smiling Moose Saloon & Grill’s 2009 Moosefest, a charity event organized by Smiling Moose owner Cheryl Vogel. At the event, paper plates with numbers written on them were scattered throughout a skydiving landing zone. Skydivers were to pick up plates on landing. Those whose numbers were written on the selected plates won raffle prizes.

Two tandem skydivers, including Manitowoc Mayor Justin Nickel, landed in the landing zone but then slid between two tents into the group of spectators, striking Scheuren and an eight-year-old boy. Scheuren suffered unspecified leg injuries that required surgery.

Mayor Nickel was ultimately dismissed from Scheuren’s lawsuit, but Scheuren obtained a default judgment against one defendant and settled with several others. Only Scheuren’s claims against Vogel remained. She argued that Wisconsin’s so-called “recreational immunity statute” shielded her and The Smiling Moose from liability. A circuit court ruled against Scheuren, so Scheuren appealed.

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