Articles Tagged with work injuries

Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “What if my employer doesn’t have workers’ comp insurance or doesn’t file the claim?”

Those who suffer injuries at work in North Carolina are able to seek workers’ compensation benefits under North Carolina’s Workers’ Compensation Act. However, a  Florida freight broker that contracted with a truck company to ship blueberries has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to reverse a North Carolina appeals court decision it argues wrongly decided that the broker was liable for an injury to a truck driver because the truck company did not have workers’ compensation insurance. In its petition, the broker company Owen Thomas Inc. told the Supreme Court that federal transportation law preempts the North Carolina workers’ compensation statute provisions that hold contractors responsible for benefits to the drivers of uninsured motor carriers. According to the North Carolina Court of Appeals, the Federal Aviation Administration Authorization Act did not preempt enforcement of the state statute because imposing liability for workers’ compensation did not amount to a regulation of price, routes, or services.

Charlotte Personal Injury Attorney Matt Arnold answers the question: “Can my employer fire me because I filed a workers’ compensation claim?”

Every year, the United States Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) publishes a list of the past year’s most frequently cited workplace safety standards. OSHA exists to set and enforce workplace safety standards. OSHA is dedicated to maintaining standards for a worker’s safety in the workplace and their rights if they should be injured while on the job. If there are violations of an OSHA standard, the workplace is cited and can face serious consequences. The following are the 10 most commonly cited standards in 2018.